Topics:

If you're looking for the least cloud latency, you want to live in the Northeast region

Tools

In late January, we kicked off what is becoming a regular feature in FierceDevOps – providing data from Cedexis on general cloud latency measured from various locations across the country. For January, Cedexis' data showed "availability hiccups" throughout the month, but the good news for February is any anomalies appear to have vanished.


Click here for a larger version of this image.


Click here for a larger version of this image.

Pete Mastin, product evangelist and business development for Cedexis, told FierceDevOps that some regions of the U.S. are simply stricken with poorer performance. Not necessarily poor, but not as great as other regions. For instance, check out the general latency connecting to major clouds the Great Lakes or Northeast compared to the likely frustrated people of the Pacific Northwest.


Click here for a larger version of this image.


Click here for a larger version of this image.

Mastin indicated that the amount of fiber in the ground connecting the east coast likely has something to do with the better performance almost across the board. That kind of infrastructure isn't everywhere, so folks further west simply have to suffer through greater latency.


Click here for a larger version of this image.


Click here for a larger version of this image.

Even western data centers have to suffer through it. Like the January metrics, the February data shows Amazon Web Services EC2 US West (Oregon) as having the worst latency, but note most of the worst offenders are sitting firmly in the Pacific Time Zone.


Click here for a larger version of this image.

For February, the region that had it best was the Northeast (again, not surprising, as Mastin noted).

Related Articles:
Cedexis latency metrics show 'availability hiccups' through January
Google's 15th data center to be built in Tennessee, will run entirely on renewable energy